Samaritans suicide statistics reports

These reports pull together the data about deaths by suicide for the UK and Republic of Ireland, which is available from official statistics bodies and provides a description of the latest suicide rates. They also provides information about the challenges we have with suicide data, guidance about how to (and how not to) use statistics, and the differences between how the individual countries produce the final suicide statistics.

 

Samaritans suicide statistics report 2018 – using data from 2017

Samaritans suicide statistics report 2017 – including data for 2013-2015

PHE’s Fingertips Suicide Prevention Profile

The Fingertips Suicide Prevention Profile was produced to help develop understanding at a local level and support an intelligence driven approach to suicide prevention. It collates and presents a range of publicly available data on suicide, associated prevalence, risk factors, and service contact among groups at increased risk.  The links below take you to the PHE site containing the live data.

Suicide Prevention Profile

National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health annual reports

The National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health annual reports provide findings relating to people who died by suicide or were convicted of homicide across all UK countries. Additional findings are presented on sudden unexplained deaths (SUD) under mental health care in England and Wales.

Their large and internationally unique database is a national case series of suicide, homicide and SUD by mental health patients over 20 years. This allows them to examine the circumstances surrounding these incidents and changes in trends over time, and to make recommendations for clinical practice and policy to improve safety in mental health care.

Annual report 2018 Annual report 2017 Annual report 2016
Annual report 2015 Annual report 2014 Annual report 2013
Annual report 2012 Annual report 2011 Annual report 2010
Annual report 2009

 

MaSH Learning: Management of Self-Harm in the Emergency Department

This online learning resource has been developed by researchers at the Manchester Self-Harm (MaSH) Project, which is part of the Centre for Suicide Prevention, a leading UK centre for research into suicidal behaviour based at The University of Manchester.

This resource has been designed to help people understand more about why people may self-harm and how to help people who present to hospital emergency departments after self-harm.

MaSH Learning: Management of Self-Harm in the Emergency Department

Domestic abuse and suicide: Exploring the links

This research, undertaken by Refuge and the University of Warwick, provides detailed substantial and original evidence on the prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempts amongst domestically abused people in the UK. It supports existing research in suggesting a significant association between experiencing domestic abuse and suffering negative psychological effects. And highlights the importance of professionals that engage with domestically abused people being more aware of and responsive to their risk of suicidality.

Domestic abuse and suicide: Exploring the links