Suicide-Safer Universities

Universities UK and PAPYRUS, the UK’s national charity dedicated to the prevention of young suicide, have published guidance to help university leaders prevent student suicides. At least 95 university students took their own lives in the 2016–17 academic year. This guide provides a framework to understand student suicide, mitigate risk, intervene when students get into difficulties, and respond to these tragic deaths. It sets out the steps you can take to make your community suicide-safer

Suicide-Safer Universities

Building Suicide-Safer Schools and Colleges

PAPYRUS has developed a guide to support teachers and school staff in building suicide-safer schools. The guide, which is downloadable on their webpage, provides school staff with an understanding of the most effective strategies to implement to create a suicide-safer environment. The material in the guide is designed for secondary school and college teachers and staff, but can be adapted for younger children too.

Building Suicide-Safer Schools and Colleges – downloadable for free on the PAPYRUS website

Help when we needed it most

Samaritans has offered the Step by Step service to schools and colleges in the UK since 2010. Samaritans have a team of trained volunteers, called Postvention Advisors who are available to offer practical support and advice to schools, colleges and other youth settings that have been affected by a suspected suicide or attempted suicide.

Help when we needed it most

National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health annual reports

The National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health annual reports provide findings relating to people who died by suicide or were convicted of homicide across all UK countries. Additional findings are presented on sudden unexplained deaths (SUD) under mental health care in England and Wales.

Their large and internationally unique database is a national case series of suicide, homicide and SUD by mental health patients over 20 years. This allows them to examine the circumstances surrounding these incidents and changes in trends over time, and to make recommendations for clinical practice and policy to improve safety in mental health care.

Annual report 2018 Annual report 2017 Annual report 2016
Annual report 2015 Annual report 2014 Annual report 2013
Annual report 2012 Annual report 2011 Annual report 2010
Annual report 2009

 

MaSH Learning: Management of Self-Harm in the Emergency Department

This online learning resource has been developed by researchers at the Manchester Self-Harm (MaSH) Project, which is part of the Centre for Suicide Prevention, a leading UK centre for research into suicidal behaviour based at The University of Manchester.

This resource has been designed to help people understand more about why people may self-harm and how to help people who present to hospital emergency departments after self-harm.

MaSH Learning: Management of Self-Harm in the Emergency Department

Understanding Suicidal Distress and Promoting Survival in LGBT Communities

This qualitative study written by MindOut, Children’s and Young Peoples Trust, University of Brighton, Brighton and Sussex Community Knowledge Exchange and Allsorts Young Project outlines key themes that underpin the experience of suicidal distress amongst two groups of LGBT people: young people and those who identify as having mental health problems.

Understanding Suicidal Distress and Promoting Survival in LGBT Communities

Help is at Hand

A postvention support guide for people affected by suicide, with both emotional and practical support.  People who have been bereaved by suicide used their experiences to lead the revision of this resource.

 

Help is at Hand

Providing support after suicide services: a suite of resources

Supporting people affected by suicide is an essential part of suicide prevention and to complement the guidance for local authorities in suicide prevention planning we worked with Public Health England and the Support After Suicide Partnership to develop a suite of resources for those developing services that provide support after a suicide.

The resources provide guidance on commissioning and delivering support after a suicide (otherwise known as postvention support), as part of a wider suicide prevention strategy. Step-by-step guidance on developing, delivering and evaluating a postvention support services, and a suggested pathway of support for people affected by suicide.

The resources are primarily aimed at local authorities and commissioners but can be used by anyone setting up and delivering services for those affected by suicide.

PHE’s Support after Suicide: A guide to providing local services Developing and Delivering Local Bereavement Services Evaluating Local Bereavement Services